Employment

  • June 12, 2024

    2nd Circ. Partially Nixes Injunction Over Amazon Firing

    The Second Circuit vacated on Wednesday a New York federal judge's order barring Amazon from firing workers for engaging in union activity, saying the judge did not explain why she imposed the broad prohibition while at the same time finding the company did not have to rehire a fired union activist.

  • June 12, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Adds Fisher Phillips Labor Pro In Houston

    Jackson Lewis PC has bolstered its labor and employment practice in Houston with a litigator who came aboard from Fisher Phillips.

  • June 11, 2024

    Seattle Port's Ex-Police Takes Wrongful Firing Case To Trial

    A former Port of Seattle police chief told a Washington state jury on Tuesday that he was wrongfully fired from his job over false claims that he retaliated against an officer, accusing the port of hiring an independent investigator to assemble a damning report in anticipation of a lawsuit over the termination.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Reinstates Parts Of Blood Analyzer Secrets Verdict

    The Federal Circuit decided Tuesday that a Rhode Island jury was right to find that an Italian company's blood analyzer computer code was stolen by a U.S. rival, but another jury will have to determine any damages.

  • June 11, 2024

    DOL's H-2A Protections Rule Flouts Labor Law, GOP AGs Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule including protections for foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program doesn't comport with federal labor law, a group of Republican attorneys general claimed in Georgia federal court, saying the rule doesn't give the same rights to U.S. citizen workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    Smoking Habit Can't Nix Retired Miner's Black Lung Benefits

    The Seventh Circuit on Monday backed a review board's decision to uphold black lung benefits for a retired coal worker who smoked cigarettes through his entire career in the mines, saying it wouldn't second-guess medical findings made at the administrative level.

  • June 11, 2024

    Raytheon Openly Prefers Younger Job Applicants, Suit Says

    Raytheon for years has violated age bias law by advertising positions explicitly meant for recent college graduates despite public statements acknowledging that the aerospace company needs thousands of additional workers, a 67-year-old job applicant alleged Tuesday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • June 11, 2024

    Home Depot Again Notches Win In OT Suit

    A California federal court ruled that although a group of workers accusing Home Depot of unpaid overtime set forth enough new evidence to reconsider a win the home improvement chain snagged, the workers didn't sustain their arguments that the company purposely tried to dodge overtime laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Sports Anchor Sues Agency Over Handling Of ESPN Feud

    Former ESPN anchor Sage Steele sued her representatives at Creative Artists Agency in California court Tuesday, alleging that the agency did not sufficiently advocate for her during a public dispute over comments she made regarding her employer's COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

  • June 11, 2024

    NC Truck Drivers Get $242K Atty Fee In Wage Suit Deal

    A North Carolina federal judge has awarded a class of truck drivers for a shredding company just under $242,000 in attorney fees on top of a $725,000 settlement to resolve claims the company deducted pay for meal breaks they did not take.

  • June 11, 2024

    AI Hiring Platform's Ex-CEO Charged With $27M Fraud

    The founder of hiring startup Joonko Diversity Inc. has been charged with fraud, with prosecutors saying Tuesday that she deceived investors into dumping $27 million into a platform that supposedly used artificial intelligence to help companies recruit diverse job candidates. 

  • June 11, 2024

    Lacrosse Coach Loses Bias Suit After Getting Cozen Booted

    A Pennsylvania federal judge tossed a lawsuit Tuesday from a high school lacrosse coach who said her contract wasn't renewed because of gender, age and disability bias, finding the school district showed that its decision stemmed from concerns about her professionalism.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Seeks Sentencing Delay Ahead Of Retrial

    Former International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 business manager John Dougherty has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to postpone his sentencing for his bribery and embezzlement convictions, pointing to the possibility of the government retrying him on extortion charges following an April mistrial in that case.

  • June 11, 2024

    Stanford Says Instructor's Firing Over Gaza Class Is Legit

    Stanford University has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by a Black Muslim lecturer who said he was let go after giving a controversial talk on the Gaza war, saying it didn't dismiss him because of his race, color or religion, but because he ran a bad classroom exercise.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Seeks Fast Trial To Test Noncompete Law

    A former DraftKings executive wants a snap trial to unwind a noncompete blocking him from work at sports-betting rival Fanatics, calling the fiercely litigated, bicoastal dispute a "test case" for California's recent law reinforcing a ban on restrictive covenants.

  • June 11, 2024

    Foley & Lardner Accused Of Underpaying Recruiter

    A legal recruiter accused Foley & Lardner LLP in a Massachusetts state court lawsuit of taking advantage of a 13-year-old contract to pay it a "woefully insufficient" fee for helping to lure a multimillion-dollar partner from another firm earlier this year.

  • June 11, 2024

    Former McElroy Deutsch Exec Fights Home Claim In Theft Suit

    With her husband having pled guilty to stealing over $1.5 million from McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP last month, the firm's former business development director held firm this week that a New Jersey state court must reject the firm's bid to put the couple's house in a constructive trust.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs Strip Club And Dancers' $165K Wage Deal

    A South Florida strip club operator will pay $165,000 to dancers who claimed they were misclassified as independent contractors and denied minimum wages, under a settlement agreement approved by a federal judge.

  • June 11, 2024

    UAW Prez Faces Probe Over Retaliation Claims, Monitor Says

    United Auto Workers President Shawn Fain and other union leaders are under investigation over allegations of retaliation and financial misconduct, an independent monitor has detailed in a report, saying the union has "slow-rolled" access to documents for the probe.

  • June 11, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Labor And Employment Pro In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP has hired as a partner for its employment law practice an attorney with prior private practice experience who has also worked for multiple companies and a labor union during her more than 20-year career.

  • June 11, 2024

    Immigration Firm Says Rival Poached Workers And Stole TM

    A Washington immigration law firm specializing in visas for domestic violence and sex trafficking victims is accusing a competing Texas firm of poaching its employees and stealing a Spanish phrase it registered a trademark for — "Arreglar sin salir!" — which translates to "fix without leaving."

  • June 10, 2024

    Weinstein Calls Accuser 'Brazen Liar' In Calif. Criminal Appeal

    Harvey Weinstein told a California appellate court that prejudicial rulings deprived him of a fair trial in the Golden State, arguing in his opening brief that the jury wrongfully heard evidence of uncharged sex assault offenses but never heard evidence that would have exposed his accuser as a "brazen liar."

  • June 10, 2024

    Ex-LA Chinatown Bank CFO Gets 3 Years For Embezzlement

    The former chief financial officer of a bank based in Los Angeles' Chinatown has been sentenced to three years in prison after pleading guilty to bank fraud for embezzling more than $700,000 from his employer.

  • June 10, 2024

    Pension Fund Repays PBGC $8M In Excess Financial Aid

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Monday that a pension provider for workers in graphic communications has paid back more than $8 million in excess funds it received through a financial assistance program administered by the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp.

  • June 10, 2024

    Feds Want Ex-Army Officer's FTCA Claims Cut From Suit

    A former major general's defamation lawsuit against the U.S. Army over an alleged domestic assault should be partially tossed, the federal government told a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday, arguing that soldiers can't sue the Army for incidents that happened while they were serving.

Expert Analysis

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

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    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • What High Court Ruling Means For Sexual Harassment Claims

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    In its recent Smith v. Spizzirri decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a district court compelling a case to arbitration is obligated to stay the case rather than dismissing it, but this requirement may result in sexual harassment cases not being heard by appellate courts, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • NCAA Settlement May End The NIL Model As We Know It

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    The recent House v. NCAA settlement in California federal court, in which the NCAA agreed to allow schools to directly pay March Madness television revenue to their athletes, may send outside name, image and likeness collectives in-house, says Mike Ingersoll at Womble Bond.

  • 5 Steps For Gov't Contractor Affirmative Action Verification

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    As the federal contractor affirmative action program certification deadline approaches, government contractors and subcontractors should take steps to determine their program obligations, and ensure any required plans are properly implemented and timely registered, say Christopher Wilkinson at Perkins Coie and Joanna Colosimo at DCI Consulting.

  • Boeing Saga Underscores Need For Ethical Corporate Culture

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    In the wake of recent allegations about Boeing’s safety culture, and amid the U.S. Department of Justice’s new whistleblower incentives, business leaders should reinvigorate their emphasis on compliance by making clear that long-term profitability requires ethical business practices, says Maxwell Carr-Howard at Dentons.

  • New OSHA Memo Helps Clarify Recordkeeping Compliance

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    Based on recent Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidance on whether musculoskeletal disorders are recordable injuries under the agency's recordkeeping regulation, it appears that OSHA may target active release techniques and stretching programs during its inspections, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • A Closer Look At Feds' Proposed Banker Compensation Rule

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    A recently proposed rule to limit financial institutions' ability to award incentive-based compensation for risk-taking may progress through the rulemaking process slowly due to the sheer number of regulators collaborating on the rule and the number of issues under consideration, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Why Jurors Balk At 'I Don't Recall' — And How To Respond

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    Jurors often react negatively to a witness who responds “I don’t remember” because they tend to hold erroneous beliefs about the nature of human memory, but attorneys can adopt a few strategies to mitigate the impact of these biases, say Steve Wood and Ava Hernández at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • Exploring Alternatives To Noncompetes Ahead Of FTC Ban

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    Ahead of the Sept. 4 effective date for the Federal Trade Commission's noncompete ban, employers should seek new ways to protect their proprietary and other sensitive information, including by revising existing confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements, says Harvey Linder at Culhane.

  • 10 Tips To Build Trust With Your Witness During Trial Prep

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    Preparing a witness for deposition or trial requires more than just legal skills — lawyers must also work to cultivate trust with the witness, using strategies ranging from wearing a hat when conducting mock cross-examination to offering them a ride to court before they testify, say Faye Paul Teller and Sara McDermott at Munger Tolles.

  • DOL's New OT Rule Will Produce Unbalanced Outcomes

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's new salary level for the Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemption is about 65% higher than the current threshold and will cause many white collar employees to be classified as nonexempt because they work in a location with a lower cost of living, not because of their duties, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • 5th Circ. Venue-Transfer Cases Highlight Mandamus Limits

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    Three ongoing cases filed within the Fifth Circuit highlight an odd procedural wrinkle that may let district courts defy an appellate writ: orders granting transfer to out-of-circuit districts, but parties opposing intercircuit transfer can work around this hurdle to effective appellate review, says Charles Fowler at McKool Smith.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

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